Windows 10 phone is dead

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Over. RIP Windows Phone and Windows 10 Mobile, we hardly knew ye.

Joe Belfiore, Microsoft's vice president of Windows, told fans on Twitter that "building new features [and hardware]" are not the company's focus at the moment.

In August Belfiore revealed he uses the Microsoft Edition of Samsung Galaxy S8 and switched to Android for better apps and hardware. But, in the end, the "volume of users is too low for most companies to invest", he added.

Joe, like Microsoft Founder Bill Gates, no longer uses a smartphone running Windows 10 Mobile OS. Not the death of the platform, but the death of the future of the platform - which, it turns out, is a bit more important than just your regular, everyday ol' death.

In case the lack of a flagship since 2015 wasn't a clue, Microsoft's Joe Belfiore has come out and effectively confirmed that Windows 10 Mobile is dead.

"We have tried VERY HARD to incent app devs".

In a bald admission, Belfiore explained Microsoft had attempted to incentivise developers to build apps for Windows Phone, but that the pool of users was just too small. However, it never gathered considerable momentum, thanks to the lack of apps and interest of developers. However, they will only be releasing bug fixes and security patches every now and then. Unfortunately, even giants like Microsoft have to face the harsh reality when it is looking at them right in the eye, and the company has finally admitted that its Windows Phone is dead. The Windows Phone operating system used Microsoft's Metro UI and offered a smattering of live tiles for its homescreen.

"The Surface performance is choppy, overall they are not making money", he said. Existing phones weren't updated, and instead, only got an entirely pointless Windows Phone 7.8 update. After the arrival of the Office suite and Skype, Microsoft has recently turned its browser Edge on the two competing platforms and launched a launcher for Android.

"After Satya Nadella took over [as chief executive], that clearly became the strategy - and after that happened what incentive was there to buy a Windows-powered phone?"

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