Norwegian Football Association to pay male and female players equally

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Currently, the men's national team players are remunerated from a pot containing around 6.55 million kroner (761,000 dollars) - over twice as much as the 3.1 million kroner allocated to the women's team.

"We want Norwegian football ahead, the ladies are as important as us".

This includes a contribution of 550,000 Krone ($112,000) by the male players, money they now receive for commercial activities undertaken as part of the national teams.

Caroline Graham Nansen, who plays her football for last season's German double-winners VfL Wolfsburg, took to Instagram to post: "It means everything for us, for our team, for our sport!"

"I just think that's how it should be, I think it can help a lot for them".

Women's pay will nearly double, from NOK3.1 million (£296,000/$388,000/€330,000) to NOK6 million (£574,000/$750,000/€639,000), with a contribution of NOK550,000 (£53,000/$69,000/€59,000) from the male players which is now received for commercial activities connected with the national team. "For showing equality and helping us all, making it a bit easier, to chase our dreams", she wrote alongside a picture of the men's side. "For the girls, it will certainly make a difference".

As the issue of pay for women's national football teams is significant around the world, Norway's football association has taken strong action to address the issue before it becomes a problem.

The Women's team have performed better on the world stage than their male counterparts.

"In Denmark they are still negotiating and in the United States things have improved, but we might be the only country where they are treated equally", added Walltin. "The federation can see it as an investment to increase the level of the women's team", he said. The Brazilian national team wrote an open letter to their confederation with multiple grievances this past week.

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