Republicans open to 'bump-stock' gun controls after Las Vegas massacre

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The National Rifle Association is calling for federal officials to review regulations that allow people to buy devices which can make semi-automatic guns fire at a rate similar to automatic weapons in the wake of a mass shooting that left almost 60 people dead and hundreds injured.

At least 12 "bump stocks" were found along with 47 guns, including rifles, at three locations, including the hotel room on the 32nd floor of the Mandalay Bay Resort where 64-year-old Stephen Paddock opened fire on a crowd of at least 22,000 people attending an open-air country music concert.

"No person should possess a device that turns a semi-automatic rifle into the equivalent of a machine gun", said Cicilline in a statement.

In the wake of the Las Vegas massacre, Governor Jay Inslee is calling for a ban of bump stock attachments; devices used to enable weapons to fire rapidly.

The argument for the legality of bump fire stocks is that the rifle itself remains semi-automatic.

She said there are a number of things that need to be changed when it comes to gun laws in our state. The so-called "bump stocks" can be purchased online for less than $200. They are capable of shooting about 60 rounds per minute, depending on how fast the trigger can be pulled.

So the NRA is asking Congress to end the gun control talk arising from the bump stock by sending it to the ATF, away from Congress's purview.

The Las Vegas gunman possessed a little-known device called a "bump stock" that was not widely sold - until now.

The National Rifle Association announced Thursday that it supports a review of bump fire stocks to see if they are in accordance with federal law.

"We know that members of both parties and multiple organisations are planning to take a look at bump stocks and related devices", White House spokeswoman Sarah Sanders told reporters.

Investigators in Nevada are looking into how the Las Vegas shooter was able to fire his weapons so quickly, and some reports point to relatively affordable - and legal - rifle accessories. They point to the speed of shots, and the inconsistent rate of fire.

"We welcome, certainly, that and conversation on that", she said.

The comments from lawmakers including No. 2 Senate Republican John Cornyn of Texas mark a surprising departure from the GOP's general antipathy to gun regulations of any kind.

What can Western Washington police learn from Vegas shooting?

"I think it's particularly inappropriate to politicize an event like this", Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., said Tuesday.

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