Why this year's Harvest Moon will be unique

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It's sure to be an incredible view you won't see again until next year.

Moreover, this moon is special because it also happens to rise at about the same time the sun sets.

It is the first full moon of fall, and looks extraordinarily large because of its proximity to the horizon. It will appear full for a couple of nights, but if you want to snap the iconic "orange moon" photo that is so often associated with the Harvest Moon you'll want to capture it just as it breaks free of the horizon on Thursday night.

There's also the Snow Moon, the Wolf Moon, the Worm Moon, the Sprouting Grass Moon, the Flower Moon, the Strawberry Moon, the Thunder Moon, the Sturgeon Moon, the Long Night's Moon, the Beaver Moon, the Hunter's Moon, and this month's moon, the Harvest Moon. In New York City, the sun will set on October 5 at 6:31 p.m. ET and the moon will rise at 6:51 p.m. ET.

So look for the moon at sunset over the next few days.

EarthSky stated while explaining about the orange color of the moon, "The orange color of a moon near the horizon is a true physical effect".

Another reason the Harvest Moon is so different from other full moons is that throughout the year, the moon generally rises an "average of about 50 minutes later each day", the Almanac reported, but the closer to the autumnal equinox, there's only a 30-minute difference. The greater thickness of atmosphere in the direction of a horizon scatters blue light most effectively, but it lets red light pass through to your eyes. That's why the moon looks more orange. So, that's why this month's full moon is called the "harvest moon", and last month's full moon was nicknamed the "corn moon".

Keep the shades at home for next month's Harvest Moon, stay warm, and happy viewing!

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