Intel Can Provide Waymo's Vehicles with the Power to Reach Full Autonomy

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Intel is working with Waymo - formerly the Google self-driving vehicle project and now with Google's parent company Alphabet - to advance self-driving auto technology.

Krzanich went on to explain that by working together, Intel can provide Waymo's vehicles with the necessary processing power to reach level 4 and 5 autonomy - the highest levels of self-driving, in which the vehicle's systems are in control of almost every aspect of the driving experience and neither need, nor expect, human input. The computer hardware maker will provide the processing components for this project. A post from Waymo disclosed that it has used Intel technology in its self-driving cars since 2009.

Intel announced plans for its own fleet of self-driving cars last month following its completion of the purchase of Israeli autonomous technology firm Mobileye.

The newest vehicles from Waymo feature Intel-based technologies for sensor processing, general compute and connectivity, "enabling real-time decisions for full autonomy in city conditions", Xinhua reported on Tuesday.

Waymo's self driving Chrysler Pacifica minivans already have Intel's hardware, but this announcement makes the collaboration formal.

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Waymo, which has developed its own sensors, is not using the autonomous vision system created by Mobileye.

Waymo stated that its engineers have been working with Intel since the design stage to integrate some of its advanced processors and other technology into its platform. It has partnered with Ford to supply its processors for its R&D vehicles. It's therefore little surprise why Waymo, Google's self-driving division, is years ahead of its rivals. And in August, Fiat Chrysler Automobiles revealed that it, too, was joining the BMW/Intel autonomous vehicle program. Those vehicles began test drives at the end of 2016.

Numerous existing self-driving cars on U.S. roads, including Waymo's, are now within or close to level 4 autonomy, making it one step away from being advanced enough to be fully autonomous.

Waymo's self-driving Chrysler Pacifica hybrid minivans are being tested on public roads in Arizona and California.

Self-driving cars have Silicon Valley salivating.

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